Thursday, January 5, 2017

Review: Furious George (2017)

By George Karl with Curt Sampson

You just knew when you watched George Karl as a college player that he would be a coach some day.

Karl was one of those guys at the University of North Carolina that certainly had some talent, but what struck people from a distance was his drive, intensity and determination. Your team might outscore his team, but you'd never defeat him. He's just come back for more.

Sure, enough, Karl earned a little playing time in pro basketball, but stayed with the sport after his playing days ended. After a few years of paying his dues, he ended up as a coach in the NBA. He's the first to say he coaches like he played.

It's been quite a ride. He goes over some of the details in "Furious George" - extra credit goes to the person who thought of that title.

There are two qualities that you'd expect from a book by Karl. He has made several stops in his coaching career, including a couple in basketball's minor leagues and one in Europe. Coaches sometimes have a short shelf life, if only because players have been known to tune them out after a few years. The good ones rebound, pardon the pun, and Karl has done a lot of that.

Meanwhile, Karl always has spoken his mind in public while coaching, although he has kept some thoughts in reserve. Now that time has gone by, he feels more free to give completely honest opinions. And in a variety of cases, Karl does.

The book has received some publicity for his commentary on the play of Carmelo Anthony when the two were together at Denver. Just to take something at random: "He was the best offensive player I ever coached. He was also a user of people, addicted to the spotlight, and very unhappy when he had to share it." Karl does say that he and Carmelo came from much different backgrounds and perspectives, and he didn't really expect his star player to instantly mesh with him. But there are some tough words along the way in the book.

Karl also has some less-than-kind things about such players as Mel Turpin and Chris Washburn, who had trouble with food and drugs respectively. Some of the owners and executives get a few choice words as well. I have no doubt that the job of coaching has changed greatly since Karl was a player, and that he's had to try to adapt to the ever-changing rules about dealing with new situations as best he could.

Karl tells his life story in a slightly frantic but entertaining fashion. The first few chapters are a bit disorganized in terms of time, as they jump around a bit from subject to subject. After that it settles down, but there is still a lot of ground to cover in terms of seasons and personalities. This isn't a complete life story, as it merely hits the highlights.

Even so, there's some interesting points to be made here, and Karl has some fun doing it. Based on the book's contents, Karl has had quite a few burgers and beers with friends and associates over the years. The menu may have changed lately because of a battle with cancer, but the book still reads like a friendly chat among friends.

"Furious George" may not be the most memorable basketball book on the shelf, but it's generally honest and fun. Those who have followed the NBA closely over the years will find the pages turn quickly.

Three stars

Learn more about this book.

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